Adobe Indesign CC: How to make letters Italic

Sometimes, you download a font or have a font that doesn’t have an italic style (see below).

In Adobe Indesign, there is a simple workaround for that.

Step 1: Make a new document, and make a text box and write.

Step 2: Highlight the text you want italic.

Step 3: Make sure you are in the text tool. In the skew box (false italic) increase the number to make the word italic and that’s it! I use the number 11

*Note: make sure the stroke color is the same as the text.

Adobe Indesign CC: How to Letters Bold

Sometimes, you download a font or have a font that doesn’t have a bold style (see below).

In Adobe Indesign, there is a simple workaround for that.

Step 1: Make a new document, and make a text box and write.

Step 2: Highlight the text you want bold.

Step 3: Open up the stroke panel. You can find it at the top: Window > Stroke

Step 4: Increase the weight number (more than 0) to make the word bold and that’s it!

*Note: make sure the stroke color is the same as the text.

Adobe Illustrator CC: Creating Arrows on lines

Step 1: Open a new document and create a line with either the pen tool or the line too. Make sure you select the line by clicking it.

Step 2: Go to Window > Stroke, to open up the Stroke panel.

Step 3: In the stroke panel where it says “Arrowheads” You can select the arrow you want. The first one is the beginning the second one is the end. The beginning is the first point create and the end is the last point you created.

Ta-da you create a line with an arrow!

This method is similar to Adobe Indesign, hope that helps!

Adobe Indesign CC: Creating Arrows on Lines

Step 1: Open a new document and create a line with either the pen tool and line tool. Make sure you click and select the line.

Step 2: Click “Window” and top menu and then go to “Stroke”.

Step 3: In the stroke panel where it says start or end you can choose the arrow. There are other options you can choose. The start is the first point and the end is the last point.

And ta-da you have an arrow!

Adobe Indesign CC: How to add hyperlinks

Step 1: Create text box with the desired text.

Step 2: Highlight and right click choose Hyperlinks>New Hyperlinks. The other option New Hyperlink from URL should be chosen when you put the actual URL in the text box.

Step 3: The New Hyperlink window will open. Type the URL in the URL box highlighted below. Click OK.

Note: The link to box has other options such as a mail link. The character style controls how it looks but you can easily change it in the character window. PDF appearance is how the link will appear in the PDF, keep it on the default.

Step 4: The link is created and you can now export when you are exporting it into a PDF file. Ensure you you have Hyperlinks checked under Include. And you are done!

Adobe Indesign CC: How to Make a Bullet List

Step 1: Create a Text Box and Write your list

Step 2: Highlight Text

Step 3: Go to upper right corner and click this icon  then click “Bullets and Numbering”

Step 4: Choose Parameters

You will see this box. From the drop menu for “List Type” choose bullets. Also, click preview in the bottom left corner to see how the list will look like. In the bottom portion of “Bullet or Number Position” are your usual attributes for the list (Will go into detail more later).

Click “OK” and your list is done. As seen below.

Side Note:

Sometimes you will get the issue of the next line not aligning with the left indent. As shown below.

To fix this go back into your bullets and numbering panels to align your bullets list.

In the left indent (First line) put 0.125, the next first line indent (Line after the bullet line) put -0.125 (Yes, you can put negative numbers). Tab Position (Shifting the whole list right), should be 0. The list will then align with the first line.

 

Adobe Indesign CC: How to Make Tables

Method 1

Step 1: Make a new document in InDesign and choose the text tool and create the size of the table you desire.

Step 2: Click within the text box and then go to the top click and click Table > Insert Table

The following box appears the options are as follows:

Body Rows: How many rows do you want?
Columns: How many columns do you want?

Header Rows: Headers is at the very top of the table, it will have a different style based on the table style.

Footer Rows: Footers is at the very bottom of the table, it will have a different style based on the table style.

Table style: How your table is is going to be stylized. Is useful when you are making multiple tables of the same table, but if you are not, don’t worry about it and stick with basics.

When you are done click OK.

Step 5: The table will then appear in the text box and you can populate it with the data you want.

Editing the Table Style 

Merging cells

Highlight the cells you to merge, right click and click merge cells.

Changing cell size

Choose the text tool and hover over the edge of the table until it changes, clicks and then pull to change the size of the cell.

You can also make the rows even by highlighting the entire table, right click and click distribute rows evenly, and you can do the same with columns.

Font & Justification

Highlight the entire table and the top there are many options to change the font and justification.

This panel is pretty intuitive.

Font Outline, Fill and Colour

The right most panel outlined in red is where you change the outline of the table. Clicking the lines you desire to change (will change blue) then click the stroke colour panel as shown. The top is the fill option and the bottom is the stroke colour panel.

Another way to change the fill and outline is to highlight the entire table right click and choose

This table options window will appear

From the drop down menu on the alternating pattern, you can choose how you want the fill to happen. This is pretty intuitive, you can do this for strokes, columns and etc. Really useful.

Method 2

Step 1: Make a new document in InDesign and choose the text tool and create the size of the table you desire.

Step 2: To make a table in InDesign, each tab is a column and each row is a new paragraph.

Step 3: When you are done, high the text and go to the top and click Table> Convert Text to Table

The following box appears the options are as follows:



When you are done click OK.

Table will then be created.

Method 2.1

Step 1: Make a new document in InDesign and choose the text tool and create the size of the table you desire.

Step 2: To make a table in InDesign, each tab is a column and each row is a new paragraph.

Step 2.1: This can get tedious when you have large amounts of data. Instead, open Excel and create a table there.

Step 2.2: Copy the table and paste it into the text box within InDesign.

Step 3: When you are done, high the text and go to the top and click Table> Convert Text to Table

The following box appears the options are as follows:

When you are done click OK.

Adobe Indesign CC: Drop Caps Tutorial

A Drop Cap usually marks the beginning of a paragraph, section or chapter usually with the beginning first character the height of two – three lines. It is a visual way to add more oomph to your work.

How to add a drop in Indesign CC

Step 1:

Create a text box and fill it will text by using the text tool.

Step 2:

Ensure that the marker is placed at the beginning of the paragraph.

Step 3:

You can click CTRL + ALT + R to bring up the drop cap window. Or you can clip the Upper right corner for this icon: it should be in your character panel and choose the “Caps and Nested Styles” option.

Step 4:

Lines: How many lines do you want it take up

Character: How many characters do you want to be in the Drop Cap Style.

 

Also, click “Preview” to see how it looks!

And that’s all folks! Have any questions about Adobe Indesign, Photoshop, or Illustrator? I would be happy to help! Leave a comment and I’ll get back to you.

Illustrator CC: Guidelines Tutorial

Guidelines are a useful tool to use, especially when using illustrator. The function is the same across all the Adobe programs, but they vary slightly on how it’s done.

Step 1: 

At the top: View > Rulers > Show Rulers

Step 2: Ensure the guidelines are on a separate layer.

The reason I suggest this is so the guidelines won’t move. When you have other objects on the artboard, you will accidently click on the guidelines. To create a new layer, click the page icon on the bottom of the layers panel.

Step 3: Creating the Guidelines

Click on the ruler and holding it down drag towards the artboard. The guideline will then appear. You do the same for the ruler on the left.

Step 4: Revising the Guidelines

If you want to change it, hover over the guideline till the mouse cursor changes and then click and drag again.

Step 5: Lock the guidelines

On the layer panel next to eye click the empty space/square and a lock will appear. Signifying the layer is locked. The guidelines now cannot move and you can go about illustrating.

Other Tips:

 You can change the units of the ruler to suits your needs in the guidelines. To do this right click on the ruler and chose the unit you wish to work in.

Hope that helps!

 

Changing your first name in Ontario

One of the best decisions I made was to change my name. If you are thinking of changing your name for whatever reason, do it. It helped me reaffirm my identity of who I was, and now that it is legal I felt more complete. No more people calling me by a name I did not like or prefer, now I can happily have all my documents say the name I wanted. There was a lot of things to do during the process and I thought I share it with other people who may be going through the same thing.

Step 1: Applying to Change Your Name

Photo by: Helloquence https://unsplash.com/@helloquence

First, to change your first name in Ontario you must fill out an application:

Name Change Form (For 16 and older)

Adult Name Change Form: http://www.forms.ssb.gov.on.ca/mbs/ssb/forms/ssbforms.nsf/FormDetail?OpenForm&ACT=RDR&TAB=PROFILE&SRCH=1&ENV=WWE&TIT=name+change&NO=007-11155E or http://www.forms.ssb.gov.on.ca/mbs/ssb/forms/ssbforms.nsf/GetAttachDocs/007-11155E~3/$File/11155E.pdf

Before you apply

You can change your name as an adult if you:

  • are 16 years of age or older
  • have lived in Ontario for the past 12 months

Name Change form (16 and under): 

Child name change Form: http://www.forms.ssb.gov.on.ca/mbs/ssb/forms/ssbforms.nsf/FormDetail?OpenForm&ACT=RDR&TAB=PROFILE&SRCH=1&ENV=WWE&TIT=name+change&NO=007-11156E

  • 16 or 17 years old you will need consent from your parent(s), guardian(s) or anyone who has legal custody of you before you can change your name (you must also complete Part 3 of the application)
  • married or have signed a Joint Declaration of Conjugal Relationship document, you must give your partner/spouse notice that you’re changing your name (you must also complete Part 2 of the application

Since I applied for the adult one I will focus on that one.

Aside from completing the form, you will need to scan your birth certificate (To show your original name and you are who you say you are). This is only for those who are born in Canada.

If you were born outside of Canada you have additional documents to provide besides your birth certificate.
– photocopy of original birthday certificate or photocopy of certified copy of birth registration from the country of birth and

– photocopy of Canadian Citizenship Card/Certificate (both sides) or photocopy of Canadian Record of Immigrant Landing or photocopy of the Permanent resident card (both sides) and 

– photocopy of passport used to enter Canada (if still held by the applicant)

It will also be a hassle if your birth certificate is not in English. Then you would need to get a certified translator.

To get anything certified you will need a notary, I used:
http://toronto-notary-public.com/

Or you can find more here: http://www.torontonotary.com/

 

Step 2: You got your

After a long wait (for me it was two months) you will receive your name change certificate in the mail. It will look something like this:

Photo by: àlvaro Serrano https://unsplash.com/photos/hjwKMkehBco

I suggest you scan it, and you carry it around with you when you are changing your name for various documents and in case your old name is in still in use. Now, you will need to change the name on a lot of important documents. Here is a list (Not exhaustive): changing your name for various documents and in case your old name is in still in use. Now, you will need to change the name on a lot of important documents. Here is a list (Not exhaustive):

  1. Driver License
  2. Canadian Citizenship
  3. School
  4. OSAP
  5. Banks
  6. SIN
  7. Passport
  8. Health Card

The question is now, what order should I do them in?
This is the order I suggest you do it.

  1. Driver’s License
  2. SIN
  3. School
  4. OSAP
  5. Bank/s
  6. Health Card
  7. Passport
  8. Canadian Citizenship

The First 5 can be done with just the name certificate and you don’t need any secondary supporting document. From 6 to 8 they require a secondary document showing your new legal name. The one I had trouble with was changing my VISA card name, when I was at my bank they told me to call VISA to change my name, and when I called VISA they told me to go to my bank. So, I will update when I have done this.

Step 3: Other tips and words advice

  • Notify others that you have changed your name, friends, family and your workplace. Remember to change your name too on Social Media Platforms.
  • Get a credit report to check for anything strange and in general, it is good practice

I would love to hear your stories regarding the process or the reasons why you changed your name.

Photo credits: Pexels.com & Featured image by: https://flash-bros.com/

Canada 150: How is Canada Celebrating its 150th Birthday?

Canada became independent on July 1, 1867! This year it will be Canada’s 150th Birthday and as a Canadian, I wanted to write a little post before this upcoming summer for my fellow Canadians. This is a momentous occasion for Canada, and the Government and other bodies are going all out doing events and getting citizens involved. For example inviting Canadians across Canada to design the logo for Canada 150, which I did but did not win (haha!). So, I’ll be writing about some notable events, celebrations and stuff that is happening this year.

1. Canadian Parks are Free!

If you ever had wanted to visit Canada’s beautiful parks, this is the year to do it. This includes National Parks, National Marine Conservation Areas and National Historic Sites across the country! You will have to order a pass, do it early to get it on time! Canada is a beautiful country and it would be a shame to not be able to see it in your lifetime.

Links:

  1. More Information
  2. Here to Order the Free Pass

 

2. Canadian Mint

The Canadian Mint went all out for Canada 150. The mint invited Citizens to help design coins for the special year according to different themes. I myself am a casual coin collector, so this is exciting for me. For the rest, make sure to look in your coins for the ones in circulation! It’ll be a great token to remember 2017.

 

Links:
See Coins here

 

3. 150 Pointes of Canada

Not only is Canada is celebrating its 150th, the National Ballet of Canada is celebrating is 65th. They are partnering with communities, people and organisations but having participants photograph their pointe shoe on location and it will be shared by the National ballet of Canada’s social media. If you are into ballet, you can participate in this unique event.

Link:

More Information

 

4. Canada Rocks 150

Canadians are attempting to break the record for Guinness World Record for the Largest Performing Rock Band. Quite ambitious I do say so myself, but it would amazing to see. Set to happen in the summer and performing four iconic Canadian rock songs. If you are a musician and feel interested check out the links below.

Links:
More information

Go fund me

5. Canada’s Day

Canada day is on July 1st, but this time it’s extra special. Some events are expanding the 1-day celebration to a week celebration. No matter where you are the fireworks display this year will be the one to beat.

To learn more about Canada 150 visit the Government’s official page HERE!

 

 

For more events in near you, check out these links:
– Toronto Canada 150 Events

Victoria Canada 150 Events

Ottawa Canada 150 Events

Macleans’s Article

– 150 Alliance 

If you know any more special Canada 150 events going on please comment, I would love to add it to this article.