Art

How To Create Numbered Tickets InDesign: Method 2

This method uses the numbered List in Adobe Indesign. See method 1 here. Let’s get to it!

Step 1

Designed your Ticket and then create a text box where your number will be. PUT A SPACE in the text box. Otherwise, this method will not work.

Step 2

Go to Type > Bulleted & Numbered Lists > Define Lists…

Step 3

Clicked “New…” It will then open to give you some options. Name your list, and click all the options. “Continued Numbers across Stories” & “Continue Numbers from Previous Document in Book”.

Step 4

Make sure you click the text tool and click into where your numbers are supposed to be.

Step 5

Click into the top control panel, or go to the Window > Control, to get it to show up. Make sure you are in the Paragraph section, and then ON YOUR KEYBOARD CLICK ALT + THE LIST SYMBOL AT THE TOP. (See circled items below).

Step 6

It will then open up into the “Bullets and Numbering” panel.

Choose:

  • List Type: Numbers
  • List: The list you defined earlier
  • Format: Choose whatever format you want
  • Mode: Continue from Previous Number…

Check the preview to make sure it works, and then click OK.

Step 7

You can see that it now shows the first number! You can remove the period by changing in the Bullets and Numbering Panel “Number:” It currently says ^#.^t. Just take out the period.

Step 8

Copy/Duplicate the elements onto the page as desired. InDesign will automatically count them for you.

Step 9

You can create more on pages, just by right-clicking and either click “Duplicate” or “Insert Pages”.

See more tickets yay!

Hope that helps! Happy creating!

How To Create Numbered Tickets InDesign: Method 1

This is a simple method that I’ve used before and is doable if you have a printer vendor. See method 2 here also!

Before you start make sure you have facing pages turned off.

Step 1

Create a single ticket design on Master Page. Keep the same design on both pages.

Step 2

Create a text box where you want the number to be

Step 3

Go to Type > Insert Special Character > Markers > Current Page Number

Step 4

Get out of master view to normal view. Then add as many pages as you would like either in the document set up or in plus + sign in the bottom right corner of the pages panel.

And tada you should have the numbers on the tickets!

Note: If you would like to change the way the numbers appear go to Layout > Number & Sections Options. Then change the Style under Page Numbering.

Indesign CC: How To Get Multiple Page Sizes

  1. To change page sizes in a single document in Adobe Indesign, first click the page you want to change in the page panel.

2. At the bottom of the panel, the 1st button at the bottom is “Page Size Change”. Click the page size you want or go to the bottom and choose “Custom…”

3. The pages should now be a different size.

Hope that helps! Happy Creating!

Indesign CC: How To Get Equal Spacing

Getting spacing right when you have multiple objects is difficult. Here’s how you do it.

One Method: Use Smart Guides

  1. At the top go to View > Grid & Guides > Smart Guides

2. When you select all the objects and move them you will see green guides to match the spacing of the previous spacing.

Second Method: Through The Align Panel

  1. Open the “Align Panel” by going to Window > Object & Layout > Align or by Shift+F7

2. You have to group the objects first before you could use the spacing tool (Distribute Spacing) in the “Align Panel” or you will end up with this mess.

3. Fix this by grouping the objects into a group. To do that select the objects you want to group. Then right click and choose “Group” or press CTRL+G

4. When you finish group all the objects. Then click “Distribute Spacing” at the bottom of the panel.

5. It will automatically space! You can also define the spacing at the bottom by checking the “Use Spacing” and put the specific spacing you want.

Hope that helps! Happy Creating.

Mori Building Digital Art Museum

I went to Japan, and I visited the Mori Building Digital Art Museum: teamLab Borderless in Tokyo. I highly recommend it if you plan on going to Tokyo to make this place one of your stops.

It is a digital art museum that has interactive components. It was amazing to experience. The museum was a massive 10,000 square meter space with 520 computers and 470 projects. With that much work and effort, they have truly made it a unique sensory experience.

The art was dynamic, it is changing, and they also even vary it by season! Like this year, they are doing cherry blossoms for their forest of resonating lamps area. The lamps are pink during that season. I wish it were pink when I was there back in October.

The art moves from one room to another, and it’s a great place to go for pictures, which is encouraged.

There is a space for kids too! There was this section where I coloured my artwork, and it appeared on the screen. It’s blowing what they can do with technology.

Honestly, I spent three hours there with my friends, and I know I could have spent three more hours there.

It’s a must-see museum for art lovers, and you must go if you are in Tokyo in the future!

You can book your ticket in advance on their website. I recommend looking through the website to pick out what exhibitions you want to see.

Protect Yourself Against Choosy Beggars

I am sure you’ve experienced being asked for free Art or not getting paid for artists from any discipline. Here are five tips to help protect yourself.

1. Barter

Friends and family will ask you for free Art. It is tough to say no to them. Saying no makes things uncomfortable, I know! Next time they ask, barter. It is one of the oldest forms of trading! Find an equivalent exchange if possible. Is your friend a baker? Makeup artist? have something you want? Ask! 

If you are on social media, a common complaint is people asking for free artwork in exchange for exposure. A common tactic is to call them out passively. Tell them that if X number of followers give them a discount code to use or tell them to get your business first through referrals by x amount of people is another example. Specify the number of people, and if they do follow on their end, their artwork will be free. 

2. Contract

You do not have to be a lawyer. Although I wish I were one, I am not smart enough, but I digress. Some main things you need to confirm before working are:

Set the numeration/payment: It is so important to know what you are charging. There are a lot of great videos on youtube advising on how to set pricing, including deposits.

In the movies, when some assassin, or illegal work, they would always ask for 50 percent or a deposit. It is a good rule of thumb too, and standard practice among many professions. Though, with less blood and crime. 

Getting the deposit helps to mitigate the cost, and even if the projects fall through, you still were able to protect yourself and not waste your time. That is just one way. Of course, if you do not have to do this. Just make sure you price your hours as best you can and have that number on hand.

Set the number of revisions: Revisions eat into your profit, so set the number of allowed modifications. Ensuring the client thinks about the piece they want you to create and does not waste your time.

Set the timeline: This is good for both parties; it sets expectations and allows you to schedule yourself properly. 

3. Watermark your artwork

If you have Photoshop, Paint, Microsoft, heck, even online, there are many free programs you can use. Watermark. Watermark is when you place text all over the Art in a low opacity. Reducing the chances, they will not just run off with the Art.

Although, there will be people who just use the watermark artwork. 

Yeah, the point is to place enough barriers between you and getting ripped off.

4. Send LQ version of the Art

In the same vein, send an LQ version of your artwork. Again, with any photo editing program, make the file smaller, stretch it out, reduce the quality. The goal is to render the artwork primarily unusable. 

Scammers may use your artwork, even with the watermark or LQ version. It has happened before, but at least it isn’t the HQ version. 

5. Just say no 

Your time and artwork are worth something, not nothing. It will be uncomfortable to say no, but the more you say it. The easier it gets. It is something you just have to get used to saying, unfortunately. In an ideal world, everyone would be honest and friendly.

6. Send an invoice for $0

An additional tip! If you still want to give free Art, may I suggest one last thing? I saw this tip on Reddit. And Oh my gosh, is it such a good tip. When you send an invoice for $0, include the original costs and the discounts. It shows the client what your work is worth, especially useful in non-profit.

These are just some tips you can implement. Good luck on your art journey, and I will see you next time.

Anyone Can Do Art

Anyone can do art! There I said it. I truly believe from the bottom of my heart that anyone can do art. Let me explain. 

Art comes in many different forms.

Art is not just fine art. They are mainly thinking of painting, drawing, digital painting/art, and the like. When people think about that narrow field, they immediately think I can’t do art. Nope! Art runs a whole gamut of areas. It is not just fine art like I said. 

Art takes many different forms. From sculpting, design clothes, dancing, music, writing, film, and more! These creative endeavours are all forms of art. If it moves you, makes you feel, inspires you. It’s art. 

So, go out there and find an area of art that attracts you and inspires you. 

There is no innate talent, just practice.

You will often hear the sentiment that it is an inborn talent. I would argue against that. Practice, targeted learning, and time are what make one talented. Just search the tag #10yearchallenge, and you can see the difference in people’s level of skill.  

Of course, you won’t be perfect right away, but you can become decent with time! You know that line. I think it goes like 1 percent talent and 99 perspiration? Or something like that. It’s hyperbolic, but talent does take hard work. Be a genius of hard work. 

There are, of course, exceptions. A few people do have an innate sense, but many people aren’t born with talent. They develop skills. 

Art is subjective

What one considers art, there will be someone else who will feel the opposite. You can do whatever your heart desires. You are not restricted to a narrow view of art. And that is what is so special about arts, being your genuine self and loving what you are creating. 

Whatever else people think, it ultimately doesn’t matter. If it’s an art to you, it’s art. 

Art doesn’t have to be serious.

You can start small. Art can be done in the comfort of your own home, you can do it as a hobby, and it grows as you grow. Art is inclusive of everyone and every skill level. So, don’t ever feel intimidated! The art community is so encouraging! 

Relatively inexpensive

Art is one of the most accessible skills. It is a low cost to get started. You can start with a pencil and a piece of paper. You can start sewing with a single scrap of fabric, dance right in your own home, take pictures with your smartphone, and more. You can choose, one day or day one. Start now! You are never too old to learn a new skill and be creative.

I hope this inspires you to go out there and make art. I’m rooting for you.

5 Tips How to Find Your Art Style

I know it is a struggle to find your art style or style in general. Here are five tips on how to find your art style that I have used myself. 

1. Learn

I know learning can sometimes drag, but it’s honestly the best thing you can do for yourself. You cannot define what your style is without learning what types there are out there. There are many terms, history, and examples you can narrow down, such as Impressionism, abstract, realism, etc. It will help you find the words for your style accurately. 

2. Curate

We live in a great time with the many applications we use. If you use Instagram, Pinterest, or have a computer. You can start curating your style. Start saving pictures, and soon a trend will emerge. You will see what visually attracts you, and that will inform your style.

3. Museums 

Museums are a great resource many others should take advantage of. Museums have so many artworks that you can get up close and personal with other artists’ work. You can find great examples of different styles, and the curators there will help you along your journey.

4. Try them out!

If you have the resources to do so, try them out and try out different mediums too! Start creating in the style that excites you, makes you curious, and you will soon be able to tell what you like working with and what you don’t. It is great to experience it firsthand to be indeed able to feel what brings you joy.

5. Talk to others

 If you can, talk to those around you! Others may see what you don’t see. Ask them to help define your style, give you ideas, and in general, motivate you too. 

Good luck on your art journey!

5 Ideas To Get Out Of An Art Block

Just like writers, I’m sure many of you experience art block. I know I do! 

So, I’ve got five ideas for you!

1. Art challenges

There are so many art challenges out there and many that are monthly. Here are the ones that are off the top of my head. 

  • January there is creaturay, where every day you draw mythical creatures on a quick list.
  • May: There is Mermay, where every day you draw a mermaid.
  • October is the month of Inktober. One of the most famous art months. You are a challenge to draw only in ink on various spooky themes.
  • November is there is a challenge called Huevember where you draw in only one colour.
  • On Instagram, visit the #drawthisinyourstylechallenge. You will see posts where you re-create an artist’s artwork in your style.

There are so many challenges, and there are so many prompt lists. You can find one you like.

Head to Instagram to find those challenges!

2. Reddit

I love Reddit, and there is something for everyone. The subreddits I recommend are “Sketch Daily,” where every day there is a prompt for you. Another subreddit is I can draw that. A lot of people are requesting free art, so if you are feeling generous, you can try that.

3. Write down your ideas as they come

I keep a google sheet on my drive with all my art ideas. I just type it in when the inspiration hits and type it in. Use any applications, notes, lists to write it out.

4. Fanart

I fangirl over so many people, shows, and movies. Pay homage!

5. Art Contests 

Google is your friend here! Search for contests that are local to you or even global. There are often specific parameters, themes, etc., that will push you and get you to inspire. Even if you don’t win, you are still a winner in my eyes.

An additional idea, but just Go out! Of course, if you are a hermit, this won’t work for you. When I go out, I get inspired.

Say NO to Spec Work

Spec Work is short for speculative work. Defined by AIGA (The Professional Association for Design) as “work done before engagement with a client in anticipation of being paid.” Most common in the design industry, such as website, graphics, and so on, but it does happen in other sectors such as software design. Spec work means the designer does not get paid. There are five types of unpaid work common:

  1. Speculative Work
  2. Competitions
  3. Volunteer Work
  4. Internships
  5. Pro bono

How it hurts the designer

Often designers who are usually starting are lured into doing speculative work, with the usual spiel of “gain recognition and exposure” or “Increase your portfolio” or “I just want to get a feel, and we can work on refining it” (Cass, 2009). What happens is that spec work very rarely leads to more work, profit or referrals. The “client” will get the complete job for free, won’t pay, and then cut all contact. Designers are often left in the dust holding nothing. Their rights to their work are gone, and the experience will leave a bitter taste, especially since designers pour time into creating the work. If the company wants to see the quality of one’s work, a portfolio, references, and experience should be enough.

How it hurts the company

The best work is done through collaboration and developing an agency-client relationship (Oetting, 2015). This allows trust and understanding to be built. Spec work does not create his kind of relationship. Often companies who are using spec work are looking to reduce cost and gain variation. This may be the case but in the long run, what you receive is low-quality work, the chance of plagiarism, no revisions, unethical, and no relationship is built (Cass, 2009).

Why it persists 

It has mainly been standard practice in the past few decades. There has only been a recent push back against spec work (AIGA, 2016). It has also been perpetrated due to the boom of the internet, which has allowed for forms of crowdsourcing, ease of finding new targets, and a large pool of desperate workers (Owyang, 2008).

Designers deserve to get paid, and they deserve to be able to make a living, just like any other job. Say NO to spec work.

References

Videos to Watch:

Here are two videos that really hit the points on the unethical nature of Spec Work.

Zulu Alpha Kilo – Spec | #saynotospec

The viral video by Zulu Alpha Kilo – a person goes around asking other people in non design occupations to provide spec work.

Mike Monteiro: F*ck You, Pay Me

A half hour lecture that highlights personal experience and give practical advice in being in the design industry.